Endorsements

Fed Up New Yorkers will endorse/oppose candidates for office as well as support/oppose legislation. Our endorsements will be based on our fundamental political objective: to contribute to the growth of an informed, progressive voting bloc in New York State.

Our endorsements will be based not only on the desirability of defeating certain incumbent legislators but also on the feasibility of doing so. Generally, this means a competitive district between Republicans and Democrats or one in which a bloc of progressive Democratic primary voters may determine the outcome.

In supporting our endorsements, we’ll explain devious political practices such as “one-house” bills, “going off the reservation,” carving out invisible pieces of the state budget to help vulnerable legislators survive, and much more.  The emphasis here is on an informed bloc of progressive voters, committed to holding accountable those who claim to represent them.

Our project is based on a couple of simple, proven principles:

First, if even a modest number of voters feel passionately about an issue and base their political behavior on it, they can prevail over a large majority who oppose their views but don’t feel as strongly about the issue. For example, an overwhelming majority of Americans favor some restrictions on the sale of guns. But even the massacres at Columbine High School, Sandy Hook Elementary, Planned Parenthood in Colorado, the terrorist slaughter in San Bernardino, California--a bloodbath virtually every week—can’t persuade a Republican-controlled Congress to impose even the mildest constraints on putting lethal weapons in the hands of right-wing lunatics and death cult jihadists. Warriors on the political podiums and talk shows, they fear the NRA’s ability to toss them out of their jobs. Simply put, progressives have to be better organized and more informed, and they have to vote.

Second, voters who reside in important pieces of political geography have outsized influence. Think battleground or early primary states. That principle applies with even greater force to state legislatures. Though many have gerrymandered themselves into lifetime jobs, it takes surprisingly few voters, especially in marginal districts, to put state legislators and the occasional congressman in fear of losing them.


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